The Jing Project

If you are like me, you have a few friends who rely on you to help them out occasionally with using their computer.  I often find myself talking with these folks by Skype both because it saves money and/or minutes on the calls and because I enjoy being hands free when I’m talking with them.  In addition Skype offers the ability to chat while you are talking which frequently proves useful for sending links to explanations or other resources that can help resolve the issue I’m working on with them.  But sometimes words fail me and it would surely be nice to be able to show them what I am talking about.  That’s where the Jing Project comes in.  It’s called a project because it’s not yet a product nor is it a beta, as the FAQ explains.  This video explains in less than 2 minutes just what it does.

L 102 So since I need to teach my buddy Paul Moor how to use Windows Live Writer to insert a picture into a blog entry, I’ll insert one into this post and use Jing to capture a screencast of doing it.   Well, since this was the first time I have used Jing, I recorded the video with no narration because I didn’t realize that it was recording sound at the same time as it was recording the video.  I’ll know better next time. 

However, what that video illustrated was that once you have navigated to the picture you want to insert, you need to choose whether you want it to display at the right or the left (I chose the right) and afterwards you need to select Custom Margins and increase the space between the text and the picture you have inserted. 

As you’ll see if you follow the link to the screencast, these videos and image captures are hosted at Screencast.com.  TechSmith, the makers of CamStudio, which I’d love to have but can’t afford, and SnagIt, which I own and use, are the founders of the Jing Project, so I am familiar with their products and their reliability as a company.  They have arranged with Screencast.com to provide an account that doesn’t expire after 60 days, as do most of Screencast.com’s trial accounts, for the duration of the Jing Project.  This link explains how to get started with the Jing Project if you are so inclined. 

One final thing about my experience of installing it.  The Jing Project requires .Net 3.0 (for Windows users) and an account at Screencast.com.  I was impressed that the setup program for the Jing Project noted that I didn’t not have .Net 3.0 installed and offered to download and install it for me.  And with the first time of sharing a capture or video, it gave me the opportunity to create an account with Screencast.com.  It is best, in my opinion, to allow the setup program to initiate those things because that the way you get the account at Screencast.com that doesn’t expire after 60 days. 

So if you are interested in experimenting with a new kind of resource, you might wish to give the Jing Project a shot.  I’m looking forward to playing with it and impressing my friends.  😉

Update: I had a reply from my friend Tom Willis who suggested that I record another Jing recording but this time include the sound. So here it is.

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2 thoughts on “The Jing Project

  1. Paul Moor

    You clever devil you. Merely that much has my poor old head spinning, so I’ll knock off for the moment – but rest assured I’ll be back (three words used without Gov. Schwarzenegger’s permission) in the hope of assimilating more than I could at this first encounter. Thank you, as always, for one more brain-stretch from Knoxville to Berlin.

    Reply
  2. Perry Post author

    The only link of significance to your interests is the one to the screencast that shows how to configure the picture once you have inserted it into the blog post. The third paragraph in the post might also be relevant. All the stuff about the Jing Project might be of peripheral interest but not necessary for you to assimilate.

    Reply

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